DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY
 

 
Course descriptions
seporator

The Fall (Fa), Spring (Sp), or Summer (Su) semesters indicated are expected but are not guaranteed. Expansive Core Curriculum courses are denoted by EXP. Service-Learning courses are denoted by SL.

TO REGISTER FOR ANY CHEMISTRY COURSE, A GRADE OF "C" OR BETTER IS REQUIRED IN ALL THE CHEMISTRY
PREREQUISITE COURSES.

CHEM 1010/1010D. General Chemistry I. An introduction to chemistry with a focus on atomic
structure, bonding, chemical stoichiometry and calculations, states of matter, and thermochemistry. 1010 has three hours of lecture per week. Drill sessions (1010D) meet once per week. Prerequisites: Completion of all developmental Mathematics requirements or eligibility for MATH 1030. Corequisite: CHEM 1010 and 1010D must be taken concurrently. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1010 and CHEM 1110. (3/0)

CHEM 1011L. General Chemistry I Laboratory. Students are introduced to explorations of chemical
and/or physical systems by discovering concepts rather than verifying them. Students who complete this course will be able to identify pertinent variables, recognize qualitative trends in data,
determine quantitative relationships and test the validity of conclusions on a particular chemical
or physical system. 1011L is a one session per week 3- hour laboratory. Corequisites: CHEM
1010/1010D. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1011L and CHEM 1111L. (1)

CHEM 1020/1020D. General Chemistry II. A continuation of the introduction to chemistry. Topics
include solutions, acid/base chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, and nuclear
chemistry. 1020 has three lectures per week. Drill sessions (1020D) meet once per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1010. Corequisite: CHEM 1020 and 1020D must be taken concurrently. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1020 and CHEM 1120. (3/0)

CHEM 1021L. General Chemistry II Laboratory. Students are introduced to a series of experiments in which schemes for separation and identification of mixtures of inorganic cations are utilized.
Students will also conduct experiments introducing them to a variety of techniques in acid-base
titrations, electrochemistry, and kinetic studies. Students who complete this course will be
familiar with the techniques and principles of qualitative inorganic analysis. In addition,
students will develop basic laboratory skills necessary for upper-level courses and for research.
1021L is a one session per week 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010/1011L. Corequisites: CHEM 1020/1020D. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1021L and CHEM 1121L. (1)

CHEM 1110/1110D. Chemistry I. Introduction to chemistry, including stoichiometry, atomic theory,
molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, physical properties, periodic trends, gases, and
intermolecular forces. Three lecture hours and one recitation per week. Prerequisites: completion
of all developmental math requirements or eligibility for MATH 1030. Corequisites: CHEM
1110/1110D/CHEM 1111L must be taken concurrently. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1010 and CHEM 1110. (3/0)

CHEM 1111L. Chemistry I Lab. Students are introduced to methods used to explore chemical/physical systems. Emphasis will be placed on data collection and analysis, and developing the lab skills required for upper-level courses. Experiments will cover a range of topics, including methods of measurement, chemical and physical properties of compounds, chemical reactivity, acid-base reactions, thermochemistry, and electrochemistry. One three-hour lab per week. Corequisites: CHEM 1110/1110D/1111L must be taken concurrently. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1011L and CHEM 1111L. (1)

CHEM 1120/1120D. Chemistry II. A continuation of the introduction to chemistry, including
stoichiometry, properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and
nuclear chemistry Three lecture hours and one recitation per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 1110/1111L or CHEM 1010/1011L. Corequisites: CHEM 1120/1120D/1121L must be taken concurrently. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1020 and CHEM 1120. (3/0)

CHEM 1121L. Chemistry II Lab. A continuation to the introduction to methods used to explore
chemical/physical systems. The lab focuses on understanding chemical reactions and their uses for qualitative and quantitative analysis of systems. Emphasis is placed on application of the
scientific method and writing skills. One three-hour lab per week. Corequisites: CHEM
1120/1120D/1121L must be taken concurrently. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 1021L and CHEM 1121L. (1)

CHEM 2210/2210D. Organic Chemistry I. Introduction to the structural theories, physical and
chemical behavior, simple synthesis, basics of reaction mechanisms, and identification of compounds composed primarily of carbon and hydrogen. The critical thinking skills needed to apply this information to a wide variety of problems, both professional and societal, are strongly developed. Drill sessions (2210D) meet once per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1020 or 1120. Corequisite: CHEM 2210 and 2210D must be taken concurrently. (3/0)

CHEM 2230L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. Students are introduced to microscale and macroscale organic laboratory techniques, selected instrumental analyses, and chemical safety. Students learn to critically assess their data and observations. Students get hands-on experience with organic reactions, instrumental analyses, and interpretations as well as presentation of results. Prerequisite: CHEM 1011L. Corequisites: CHEM 2210/2210D. (1)

CHEM 2220/2220D. Organic Chemistry II. A continuation to the introduction to the structural
theories, physical and chemical behavior, synthesis, reaction mechanisms, and identification of
compounds composed primarily of carbon and hydrogen. This course has significant emphasis on
synthesis, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopy. Students who complete the course will become familiar with the large body of information required before the chemistry of living systems
(biochemistry and molecular biology) can be studied. The critical thinking skills needed to apply
this information to a wide variety of problems, both professional and societal, are strongly
developed. Drill sessions (2220D) meet once per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2210. Corequisite:
CHEM 2220 and 2220D must be taken concurrently. (3/0)

CHEM 2240L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. Students get hand-on experience with performing
microscale and macroscale organic laboratory techniques, selected instrumental analyses, organic
reactions, and syntheses. Students learn to critically assess their data and observations, and to
prepare organized, scientific reports from their findings. Prerequisite: CHEM 2230L. Corequisites:
CHEM 2220/2020D. (1)

CHEM 3010. Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences. Principles of physical chemistry as applied to biological and biomedical systems. Students who complete this course will gain an understanding of the physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases, the laws of thermodynamics, the properties of solutions, principles of chemical equilibria and chemical kinetics, quantum mechanical treatment of atoms and molecules, and the theory and applications of spectroscopy. The course will develop the critical thinking and computational skills of the students. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L, MATH 1070, and PHYS 2010/2010L. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 3010 and CHEM 3030. (3)

CHEM 3030. Physical Chemistry I. A survey of the principles of physical chemistry including
thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics. Students who complete this course will gain an in-depth understanding of the principles governing the
interaction of matter and energy,and will develop their critical thinking and computational skills. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L, MATH 2070, and PHYS 2020/2020L. Students may not earn credit for both CHEM 3010 and CHEM 3030. (3)

CHEM 3030L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory I. A selection of experiments featuring the applications of the principles of physical chemistry. Experiments include the use of physical chemistry techniques to examine the properties of solids, liquids, and gases, reaction kinetics, and systems at equilibrium. The course requires extensive computational and writing skills. One
three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L. Corequisite: CHEM 3010 or 3030. (1)

CHEM 3040. Physical Chemistry II. Advanced topics in atomic and molecular quantum theory, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, and photochemistry. Students who complete this course will gain an understanding of the properties of atoms and molecules, and the principles of the different types of spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L, MATH 2070, and PHYS 2020/2020L. (3)

CHEM 3040L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory II. A selection of experiments featuring the applications of the principles of physical chemistry. Experiments include the use of physical chemistry techniques to examine the properties of solids, liquids, and gases, and various spectroscopic techniques to characterize substances. The course requires extensive computational and writing skills. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L and CHEM 3010 or 3030.
(1)

CHEM 3130. Introduction to Biochemistry. The student's understanding of cellular structure and
composition on the molecular level will be developed through a study of the physical and chemical
properties of the biomolecules of cells. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2240L. (3)

CHEM 3130L. Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory. A selection of experiments covering the
isolation of biochemical substances and the study of their properties. This course will enable the
student to readily perform isolations of a number of types of biochemical substances, and to
determine their properties and concentrations while gaining some skills in the use of common
laboratory techniques and instruments. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2240L. (1)

CHEM 3210/3210L. Quantitative Analysis. Theory and techniques of chemical analysis including
evaluation of data, gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric methods. 3210L
is a one session four- hour laboratory which must be taken along with 3210. Prerequisites: CHEM
1020/1021L. (3/1)

CHEM 3450. Toxicology. A study of the fundamental principles of toxicology with emphasis on the
chemical reactions and mechanisms involved. Topics include entry and fate of toxicants in the body, metabolism, toxic effects, and quantitation. A student completing this course will have a better understanding of the adverse effects of chemicals and other agents to human beings. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220, BIOL 1240. (3)

CHEM 4010. Inorganic Chemistry I. A study of the theories and principles of bonding and structure
as well as the descriptive chemistry and applications of the elements and their simple compounds. A student completing this course will be familiar with the information needed to connect the
fundamental theories of inorganic chemistry with the new technological applications of inorganic
compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 3030 or CHEM 3010. (3)

CHEM 4011. Inorganic Chemistry II. A study of the theories and principles of coordination
chemistry, solution chemistry, and applications of organometallic and bioinorganic compounds. A
student completing this course will be familiar with the information needed to relate coordination
compounds and their reactions to the expanding applied fields of organometallics, catalysis and
bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 4010. (3)

CHEM 4073. Chemistry Literature Research. Students participate in an independent literature
research project under the close supervision of a faculty advisor. This entails familiarization
with relevant chemical literature, literature search, preparation of an abstract and a written
report, and presentation of a departmental seminar. Students who complete this course learn to
search and critically review the literature, evaluate their findings, prepare a formal and detailed
research report, and present a seminar for constructive review by their peers and the faculty.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2240L. (3)

CHEM 4080. Introduction to Research. Students are paired with research mentors who prepare them for research through a literature search and studies as well as research training. Students are also required to attend seminars offered at the scheduled class period weekly. These seminars will
include lectures on such topics as chemical safety and research ethics. Students are required to
present a literature seminar or a research prospectus during the semester. Prerequisites: CHEM
2220/2240L. (0)

CHEM 4083. Undergraduate Research. Students participate in an independent and original
laboratory research project under the close supervision of a faculty advisor. This entails
familiarization with relevant chemical literature, laboratory work, preparation of an abstract and
written report, and presentation of a departmental seminar. Students who complete this course learn to search and critically review the literature, develop specialized laboratory skills, evaluate
their data, prepare a formal and detailed research report, and present a seminar for constructive
review by their peers and the faculty. Students desiring credit for research performed off campus
must obtain approval of their project from the course coordinator, register for this course, and
present the required written and oral reports and a letter of evaluation from the off-campus
supervisor of the research. Prerequisites: CHEM 4080 or permission of the course coordinator. (3)

CHEM 4140. Metabolism. A study of biochemical energetics and the many biochemical pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, protein, and nucleic acid metabolism. The student will gain insight into the
metabolism of biochemical substances on the molecular level, and insight into the universal and integrated nature of metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM 3130. (3)

CHEM 4150L. Genomics and Proteomics Lab. This course is designed to introduce students to the
laboratory and computational methodologies used in analyzing DNA and proteins using modern
molecular biology, chemistry, and bioinformatics techniques. A student completing this course will
have better insight into the theoretical and practical aspects of the structure and function of DNA
and proteins. This course may be used as a senior capstone experience. Prerequisites: CHEM
3130/3130L. (2)

CHEM 4151, CHEM 4152, and CHEM 4153. Special Topics. Detailed discussion of one or more topics in chemistry. (1, 2, 3)

CHEM 4160. Enzymology. A study of enzymes covering topics ranging from their isolation and
purification from living organisms to their function and uses. The course will focus on complex
kinetic studies and a study of the mechanism of action of complex enzymes. Prerequisites: CHEM
3130/3130L. (3)

CHEM 4210. Advanced Organic Chemistry. The aim of this course is to solidify the student's
understanding of certain basic concepts covered in CHEM 2210- 2220. Structures of organic
compounds, reaction mechanisms, and stereochemistry of organic reactions are emphasized. The
student will gain a deeper understanding of these topics and insight into the experimental
foundation of abstract concepts. Prerequisite: CHEM 2220. (3)

CHEM 4230. Principles of Polymer Chemistry. Topics include polymer solutions, molecular weight
measurement, analysis and testing, mechanical properties, polymer structure and physical
properties, polymerization methods, and polymer processing. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2240L and CHEM 3010 (or CHEM 3030). (3)
CHEM 4240/4240L. Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis. An introduction to the
theories, operations, and applications of spectroscopic, electrochemical, and chromatographic instrumentation in chemical analysis. Students will acquire hands-on experience in the operation and use of several instruments commonly employed in chemical analysis. Students who successfully complete this course will have developed the critical thinking and laboratory skills necessary to apply various instrumentation to the solution of problems in chemical analysis. Laboratory meets in one four-hour session. CHEM 4240 and 4240L must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L. (4/0)

CHEM 4250. Drug Design and Synthesis. This course will provide an overview of fundamental
principles of medicinal chemistry including drug development, drug design, lead compound discovery, and drug synthesis. Emphasis will be placed on the chemical reactions and mechanisms involved. An overview of drug classes and mechanisms of activity will be included. Prerequisite: CHEM 2220. (3)

CHEM 4310L. Synthesis Laboratory. Advanced methods in the synthesis and characterization of organic and inorganic compounds; includes an independent project. A wide range of compounds are synthesized, including organic, bioinorganic, organometallic, and coordination compounds. Concepts and principles of green chemistry are introduced and incorporated throughout the course. The student is expected to become skilled in a variety of synthetic and spectroscopic techniques used in a modern chemistry laboratory. By the end of the semester, the student should be able to
independently research a synthetic problem and design a procedure to execute that synthesis. The
student will also be able to report experimental results using the format approved by the
American Chemical Society for publications. This course may be used as a senior capstone
experience. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L. (2)

CHEM 4320L. Molecular Structure and Organic Synthesis Laboratory. Students perform multi- step
synthesis and identify unknown and synthesized compounds. A variety of chemical and spectroscopic characterization methods are used. This course seeks to bridge the gap between the elementary organic lab and the advanced organic research lab. It allows students to develop critical reasoning skills, computational skills and oral and written presentation skills necessary for a professional career in science. This course may be used as a senior capstone experience. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2240L. (2)

 
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